New York Medical College

Table of Contents

Tours

  1. NYMC Campus Tour

    Founded in 1860, New York Medical College is one of the oldest and largest private health sciences universities in the country with more than 1,400 students, 1,300 residents and clinical fellows, 3,000 faculty members, and 15,000 alumni. New York Medical College is the leading academic and biomedical research university in the Hudson Valley. New York Medical College, which joined the Touro College and University System in 2011, is located in Valhalla, NY, in Westchester County in the picturesque lower Hudson Valley region of New York State just 30 minutes north of New York City. New York Medical College offers advanced degrees from the School of Medicine, the Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences, and the School of Health Sciences and Practice. As the leading academic and biomedical research institution between New York City and Albany, the school manages more than $36 million in research and other sponsored programs, notably in the areas of cancer, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases, kidney disease and the neurosciences. With a network of affiliated hospitals that includes large urban medical centers, small suburban clinics and high-tech regional tertiary care facilities; medical students and residents are afforded a wide variety of clinical training opportunities throughout the tri-state region.

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    1. New York Medical College

      Founded in 1860, New York Medical College is one of the oldest and largest private health sciences universities in the country with more than 1,400 students, 1,300 residents and clinical fellows, 3,000 faculty members, and 15,000 alumni. New York Medical College is the leading academic and biomedical research university in the Hudson Valley. New York Medical College, which joined the Touro College and University System in 2011, is located in Valhalla, NY, in Westchester County in the picturesque lower Hudson Valley region of New York State just 30 minutes north of New York City. New York Medical College offers advanced degrees from the School of Medicine, the Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences, and the School of Health Sciences and Practice. As the leading academic and biomedical research institution between New York City and Albany, the school manages more than $36 million in research and other sponsored programs, notably in the areas of cancer, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases, kidney disease and the neurosciences. With a network of affiliated hospitals that includes large urban medical centers, small suburban clinics and high-tech regional tertiary care facilities; medical students and residents are afforded a wide variety of clinical training opportunities throughout the tri-state region. 

       

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      HISTORY

       

      On April 12, 1860, William Cullen Bryant, a poet and editor of the New York Evening Post (known today as The New York Post), along with a small cohort of the some of New York City’s leading citizens, were granted a charter for a new medical college, which began its life with the rather cumbersome name, The Homeopathic Medical College of the State of New York in New York City.

       

      The first class of 59 students began their studies in October of 1860, attending classes in three lecture halls and a dissection room on the second floor of a building at 151 East 13th Street, at the corner of Third Avenue. The only other medical school in New York City at that time was the College of Physicians and Surgeons, part of what is now Columbia University. Jacob Beakley, M.D., professor of surgery, was named dean of the faculty, and in 1862, Bryant himself began a 10-year term as president of the Board of Council—the trustees.

       

      In 1863, a separate but related institution known as the New York Medical College for Women was founded by Dr. Clemence Sophia Lozier, staffed and supervised by many of the College’s male faculty. In 1867, Dr. Lozier’s institution graduated the first female Canadian physician, Dr. Emily Stowe, who had previously been refused admission to every medical school in her native Canada. Dr. Susan McKinney, the first African-American female physician in New York State and the third in the nation, graduated from New York Medical College for Women in 1870 with the highest grade in the class. When the women's institution closed in 1918, the students were absorbed into New York Medical College.

       

      The New York Medical College's Certificate of Incorporation was amended in 1938 to include authority to award graduate degrees in addition to the M.D.; and in 1963, the Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences was founded, establishing for the first time graduate education within a school separate from the medical curriculum.

       

      In 1971, New York Medical College moved to Valhalla, at the invitation of the Westchester County government, which desired to build an academic medical center.

       

      The School of Health Sciences and Practice (SHSP) was founded in 1980 to respond to the growing regional and national need for healthcare professionals. Shortly after, in 1984, the New York State Department of Education recognized New York Medical College as having university status.

       

      In a ceremony held at Bryant Park in New York City on May 25, 2011, New York Medical College officially joined the Touro College and University System creating one of the largest health sciences universities in the U.S.

    2. Sunshine Cottage (Administration Building)

      Sunshine Cottage, also known as the Administration Building, is the administrative headquarters of New York Medical College. The offices of the president, chancellor, dean of the School of Medicine, senior academic and administrative leadership are located here, as are the Offices of Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, Admissions, Student Financial Planning, Housing, Bursar, Undergraduate Medical Education and Public Relations, among others.

       

      Grasslands Hospital, the predecessor of the Westchester Medical Center, opened Sunshine Cottage as a thirty-five bed children's tuberculosis hospital in 1931. The building, adorned with animal and nature motifs, symbolized health and happiness, and referred to the typical treatment regimen of rest, fresh air, and sunshine. The noted architectural team of Walker and Gillette designed this building. The fanciful animals in the surrounding fences, the motifs of the rising sun and nature scenes over the windows and on the pediments, the rabbit over the door, and the animal sculptures that formerly resided on the pillars of the fences were designed to brighten the lives and speed the recovery of sick children. They remind the health care providers of today that one must always treat the whole patient: not only the disease but also the patient's spirit and attitude. We hope the animal and nature images and statues you see on and surrounding this building remind you that, no matter how technology in health care evolves, the values of care and compassion remain at the core of what we do.
    3. Sunshine Heritage Halls

      Visitors to Heritage Hall in Sunshine Cottage get a glimpse of NYMC through the years with photos and renderings of New York Medical College buildings and notables. Heritage Halls continues throughout all the halls and open spaces around the NYMC campus buildings.

       

      A link to the virtual portrait gallery is available on the Health Sciences Library website at http://guides.library.nymc.edu/browse.php?o=s.

    4. Sunshine Cottage Green

      The Sunshine Cottage Green is where many intramural sports competitions are held, such as frisbee, flag football and soccer.

    5. Vosburgh Pavilion

      Vosburgh Pavilion houses a number of New York Medical College administrative offices.

       

      Vosburgh Pavilion has a previous life as a psychiatric facility prior to New York Medical College's move to Westchester.

    6. The School of Health Sciences and Practice (SHSP) Building

      The School of Health Sciences and Practice (SHSP) Building houses NYMC's School of Health Sciences and Practice is the hub for students pursuing degrees in public health, physical therapy and speech-language pathology.

       

      Classrooms, study rooms, a student lounge and faculty and administrative offices are located there as well as the Alumni Computer Laboratory and the Center for Interactive Learning, a 2,160 square foot specially designed classroom used for videoconferencing, seminars and meetings. The building also houses the physical therapy lab as well as the speech-language pathology lab.

       

    7. Center for Interactive Learning

      The 2,160 sq. ft. Center for Interactive Learning is located on the first floor of the School of Health Sciences and Practice (SHSP) building. It is a specially designed classroom used for videoconferencing classes, seminars, meetings, and grand rounds.

    8. Footman Statues

      The frog-footman and fish-footman are two characters from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The restored statues that used to adorn the pediatric tuberculosis hospital, now home of the Sunshine Cottage Administration building, were put in place to brighten the spirit and speed the recovery of the sick children. Those whimsical animals now have a new home along the walkway that leads to Dana Road. 

      Today, those fanciful creatures represent our College's commitment to caring for the complete person and quietly convey the important message to treat the whole patient - body, mind and spirit. 
    9. Medical Education Center (MEC)

      Opened in 2001, the Medical Education Center (MEC), a 56,000 square-foot four-story building, is considered a second home to many medical students at NYMC. The first floor contains the light-filled Blanche and Albert Willner, M.D. '43, Atrium Lobby and the 250-seat John W. Nevins, M.D. ’44, Auditorium.

       

      The second and third floors accommodate students in a variety of flexible configurations within nine module classrooms, each divided into small group teaching and study rooms.

       

      The Alumni Gross Anatomy Laboratory occupies the entire top floor with an innovative light-filled design. The 8,500 square foot facility features 36 dissecting tables, a specialized ventilation system, natural northern light exposure and changing areas with showers and lockers.

       

    10. The Blanche and Albert Willner, M.D. '43 Atrium Lobby

      Historical faculty portraits adorn the walls of the Medical Education Center (MEC) Blanche and Albert Willner, M.D. '43 Atrium Lobby. These portraits depict some of the key figures who played leading roles in the formative years of the College (then known as the New York Homeopathic Medical College). Reflecting the College’s second home at New York Ophthalmic Hospital (1872-1889), several of these portraits depict members of the ophthalmology faculty. All of these figures were highly regarded in their day and most were well published with many of their important texts still published in re-print form today.

       

      The procurement, restoration and display of these portraits is the culmination of 35 years of work. Most of the College’s large portrait collection had been left at Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospital (now Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center) when NYMC moved to Valhalla in the 1970s. The majority of these portraits were discovered and returned to the College through the efforts of Jay Tartell, M.D. ’82, when he was a medical student. A second smaller group of portraits and historic artifacts remaining at Cardinal Cooke were recovered by Dr. Tartell and Edward C. Halperin, M.D., chancellor and chief executive officer in 2013. Recently, several important portraits and their frames were professionally restored with funds from the NYMC Alumni Association and Dr. Tartell.

       

      The College’s 19th century faculty portraits are closely grouped on walls of the MEC lobby in a period-appropriate “salon style.” This style of displaying artworks came into vogue in the 19th century as a way of conveying the size and importance of many large private and public art collections of the times. Large museums, including the Louvre and the Metropolitan Museum of Art as well as private art salons in the mansions of wealthy collectors such as the Vanderbilt family, densely displayed paintings to the ceiling in keeping with the opulence which was a hallmark of the Gilded Age.

       

      Read more about these faculty portraits on the Health Sciences Library website.


      Timothy Field Allen, A.M., M.D., LL.D., 1837-1902
      Frank Hopkins Boynton, M.D., 1850-1913
      Walter Gray Crump, M.D., 1869-1945
      William Tod Helmuth, M.D., LL.D, 1833-1902
      George S. Norton, M.D., 1851-1891
      George Watson Roberts, Ph.B., M.D., 1866-1931

       

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      About Albert Willner, M.D. ’43

       

      Albert Willner, M.D. ’43 (1918–2011), was an alumnus and former College trustee. From the day he became a physician, Dr. Willner ardently believed he owed a debt of gratitude to New York Medical College for giving him the education he needed to succeed. Throughout his entire career he worked tirelessly to repay that debt—even donating the first paycheck he earned as a physician to the College. He was active in the Alumni Association for more than four decades, joined the Board of Trustees in 1996, and was a member of the President’s National Advisory Council.

       

      Dr. Willner and his wife Blanche were generous supporters of the medical student scholarship program, often responding to needs they learned about on their visits to campus by underwriting various campus facilities and structures. In the late 1990s Dr. Willner and his family donated funds to build a playground in student housing, and later funded the renovation and construction of the atrium lobby of the Medical Education Center (MEC) which is named after the couple in honor of their longtime patronage and dedication.

       

      In 2006, the College awarded Dr. Willner the William Cullen Bryant medal, in recognition for his distinguished and wide-ranging leadership. He once said, “I hope that those students who are part of the College today will not take the value of [their education] for granted, and will help in their own way when they become leaders in medicine.”

       

      One of three children born to parents who left Poland and came to the U.S. in the 1890s, Albert Willner was one of several “Dr. Willners” in his family: his uncle Irving (who graduated from New York Medical College in 1913), his brothers Philip and Milton, and Albert himself, who met his wife, Blanche, on a commuter train while attending New York University as an undergraduate. Their two children became doctors, and so did several grandchildren, a nephew and a grandnephew—all told, about one out of three were New York Medical College graduates.

       

      Albert Willner, M.D. ’43 died on November 16, 2011, at the age of 93. He was predeceased by his wife Blanche, and is survived by his son, Dr. Joseph Willner, daughter Dr. Jane Bloomgarden, and numerous nieces, nephews and grandchildren, including Noah Bloomgarden, M.D. ’10.

    11. The John W. Nevins, M.D. ’44 Auditorium

      The John W. Nevins, M.D. ’44 Auditorium is fully enabled to host and receive all types of conferencing including video, audio and web-based. It offers full a/v support as well as wired and wireless internet access including dual 35 mm. slide projectors and high-resolution video projector, integrated instructor’s console with PC, document camera, slide-video converter and laptop connection. Integrated touch screen control of all a/v components is available from both podium and control room.

    12. Module Rooms

      The second floor (Pasquale Montesano, M.D., '38, Floor) and third floor of the MEC accommodate students in a variety of flexible configurations within nine module classrooms, each divided into small group teaching and study rooms, known as Module Rooms (The Mods).

       

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      Three generations of the Montesano family have a very special place in the hearts of many at the College—and on the second floor of the Medical Education Center (MEC). Pasquale X. Montesano, M.D. ’79, generously named the second floor of the MEC in loving tribute to his parents, Pasquale X. Montesano, M.D. ’38 and Theresa Montesano, R.N. ’37.

       

      The Montesano family ties to the College go back to the 1930s when Pasquale X. Montesano, M.D. ’38, graduated from the School of Medicine and Theresa Montesano, R.N. ’37, attended the College’s former nurse training program. Four decades later, their son, Pasquale X. Montesano, M.D. ’79, continued the tradition and graduated with a specialty in orthopaedic surgery.  Dr. Montesano has since become a prominent physician in the field of spinal and neck disorders.

       

      Dr. Montesano completed residencies at Metropolitan Hospital Center and St. Vincent’s Hospital in New York City. He held appointments at Westchester Medical Center, Metropolitan Hospital Center, St. Vincent’s Hospital, North Kansas City Memorial Hospital, and University of California, Davis Medical Center prior to opening his private practice in California in 1992. His career has also included serving as the Spine Consultant for the NBA Sacramento Kings and as Liaison Orthopedist for the 1987 Coors’ International Bicycle Classic. 

       

    13. The Alumni Gross Anatomy Laboratory

      The Alumni Gross Anatomy Laboratory occupies the entire top floor of the MEC with an innovative light-filled design. The 8,500 square foot facility features 36 dissecting tables with wired and secured wireless networking available at each table, a specialized ventilation system, natural northern light exposure and separate student and faculty changing areas with showers and lockers.

    14. Basic Sciences Building (BSB)

      The Basic Sciences Building was completed in 1972. Lectures, labs and study modules, were all located here during the College’s transition from Manhattan to Westchester County. Today it is the home of NYMC’s Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences. The Basic Sciences Building (BSB) has approximately 122,000 square feet of laboratory and office space dedicated to research. The space is configured as open laboratories with core instrument areas in order to provide maximum flexibility for the recruitment of top-level faculty scientists

    15. The Drs. Esther and Ben Chouake Auditorium

      Renovated in 2008, the Drs. Esther and Ben Chouake Auditorium, formerly known as the Blue Auditorium, offers full audio/visual support as well as wired and wireless internet access. It features a podium with laptop connection and the ability to receive web conferences, and to host and receive videoconferences via a portable videoconferencing unit.

    16. The Thomas & Mary Alice Hales Lobby (BSB Lobby)

      The Thomas & Mary Alice Hales Lobby, colloquially known as the BSB Lobby, is located within the Basic Sciences Building (BSB). Arguably the most central and frequently traversed place on the college campus, is a welcoming oasis, nestled in the busy landscape of research labs, teaching facilities, Health Sciences Library, bookstore and Doc’s café.

       

      The 2009 renovation and redesign of this campus hub of activity was made possible in part by a donation from trustee Thomas E. Hales and his wife Alice Marie Hales. A modern look, with a nod to school spirit through its use of the school colors, maroon and ochre, embodies the décor. 

       

      Designated seating areas are arranged to serve different purposes, where groups of students might gather for study or socialization, while others are designed for more intimate conversations or relaxation between classes. But the design feature that makes the lobby and its environs unique to New York Medical College is the original artwork. Six panels of graphic art in a motif of trees and leaves line the walls and adjacent hallway. Through a series of historical photos, the panels mark important milestones along the fascinating journey the College has taken throughout its history. Street scenes, buildings, laboratories and classrooms from the late 1800s onward are all part of the story. So are key figures in the school’s history, like Clemence Sophia Lozier, M.D., William Cullen Bryant and Cardinal Terence Cooke. Quotations from noted thinkers such as John F. Kennedy, Marcus Aurelius , Oliver Wendell Holmes and William Butler Yeats bring the school’s evolution full circle, impressing upon the readers the impact that medicine, science and an abiding concern for humanity have had upon the College and the world at large. People can walk through the lobby and gain an understanding of how the College is rooted in a long span of history, one that will go on long after they have graduated.

       

    17. The Health Sciences Library (HSL)

      The Health Sciences Library (HSL) serves all faculty, students, employees, and sponsored residents and fellows of the New York Medical College.

       

      The 19,000 square feet Health Sciences Library is in the junction between the Basic Sciences Building (BSB) and the Medical Education Center (MEC), right off the BSB Lobby and across from Doc's Cafe. 

       

      The Mastronardi Room, located behind the Reference Desk near the entrance to the Library, is equipped with nine computers ideal for quickly looking up resources or checking email. These computers are available at all times during library hours and their proximity to the reference desk makes getting help with research questions easy and convenient. A scanner is also available in this room.


      Renovated in 2010 through a generous donation of Mark Novitch, M.D. '58, HSL's A. Mark Novitch, M.D. '58 Computer Lab provides PCs for use by the NYMC community. The Lab boasts state-of-art equipment including a 60” wall-mounted LCD monitor, a scanner and 9 computers. The Lab is also equipped with eight PCs and one iMac, one scanner, a projection screen, whiteboard and teleconferencing capabilities. It is available for use by all New York Medical College Health Sciences Library patrons with valid ID.


      The Health Sciences Library also has an additional 3,033 square feet branch in the 19 Skyline Drive building complex.

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      New York Homeopathic Medical College, as NYMC was then known, first opened a library in 1885 at the behest of students and alumni when the college was located at Flower Hospital in New York City. Shortly after NYMC's move to Westchester in 1972, the libraries of New York Medical College-Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals merged with the Westchester Academy of Medicine in nearby Purchase, New York. As of 2011, when New York Medical College became part of the Touro College and University System, all Touro faculty and students have on site access to the library facilities and resources.


      Consortia: The New York State Library has designated the Health Sciences Library as a Leader Electronic Doorway Library. The Library is also a Resource Library in the Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM). The Library actively participates in the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) global network and remains a full member of METRO, the New York metropolitan area library planning cooperative. Loansome Doc use is promoted and encouraged; we honor METRO card access for the public via local libraries. The Library is also a founding member of the HILOW+ library consortia, composed of health sciences libraries in the upper Westchester County and Hudson Valley region of New York State.

    18. Marcelle Bernard, M.D. '44, Archival Collections Room

      The NYMC Health Sciences Library focuses on materials produced by or about NYMC, or its faculty, students, or alumni. Historic and rare books are shelved in the Marcelle Bernard, M.D. '44, Archival Collections Room.
    19. Anatomage and Radiology Suite

      The Radiology Suite features multiple interactive screens allowing for independent and group study, as well as the cutting-edge Anatomage Table, which displays human gross anatomy in real-life size using data from actual patient scans or cadavers and will serve as a complementary tool for cadaver-based dissection courses. The table’s visualization screen spans 81 inches long and 22 inches wide and students can use it collaboratively to explore bone fractures, aneurysms, carcinoma and dozens of other unique case examples. 
    20. BSB Student Lounge/Recreation Room

      The Student Lounge is located within the Basic Sciences Building, and has a pool table, a ping-pong table and a big-screen TV.

    21. NYMC Bookstore

      The NYMC Bookstore provides quality service to students and faculty from 8:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Friday. During peak periods, the Bookstore hours are flexible.

       

      Please stop by or call the Bookstore at (914) 594-4229 or visit the NYMC Online Bookstore.

       

    22. Freeman Dining Room

      Offset from the rest of Doc's Cafe is a private dining area called Freeman Dining Room. It is an area reserved for those who wish to dine in a quiet area.

    23. Doc's Cafe

      Doc’s Café, a160-seat full-service cafeteria, serves a wide variety of healthy and nutritious Glatt Kosher foods and meals under CulinArt Food Services. Doc’s Café serves breakfast and lunch and provides catering services for campus events. The dining facility also has a private dining area called Freeman Dining Room.

       

    24. Terence Cardinal Cooke Auditorium

      The Terence Cardinal Cooke Auditorium, formerly known as the Orange Auditorium, offers full a/v support as well as wired and wireless internet access. It features a podium with laptop connection and the ability to receive web conferences, and to host and receive videoconferences via a portable videoconferencing unit.

    25. Department of Pharmacology Mass Spectrometry Core Laboratory

      One of the NYMC’s core facilities, the Mass Spectrometry Core Laboratory is located in the College’s Department of Pharmacology.Approximately 400 sq. ft. of air-conditioned laboratory space houses the instruments for LC/MS/MS and GC/MS analyses. 

    26. Plane Tree of Hippocrates

      A gift from the Greek Dodecanese island of Cos, historic birthplace of Hippocrates, the father of western medicine, the seed of the NYMC Plane Tree (platanus orientalis) comes from the Tree of Hippocrates under which Hippocrates is said to have conducted his medical classes some 25 centuries ago.

      55 years ago, seeds of Tree of Hippocrates were given to each medical school in the U.S.; one of them being New York Medical College during the NYMC centennial celebration in 1960. It was planted outside of the main building in Manhattan at 106th Street and 5th Avenue. When the College moved to Westchester, the tree came also and to this day stands just south of the Basic Sciences Building.
    27. Outdoor Basketball Court

      In addition to Nicholas and Liberta Testa Fitness Center in the Student Center, many students gather for informal sports competitions in the field behind Alumni House, and the outdoor-lit basketball courts located behind the Basic Sciences Building.

    28. Alumni House

      Alumni House

       

      The Alumni House is important technologically, architecturally, and historically. The structure is an unusual example of the use of poured concrete for residential use which was constructed and occupied by prominent county residents.

       

      The site of the house has a history dating back to pre-revolutionary times. The first occupant of a dwelling on this site was believed to be Captain Thaddeus Avery. Avery, a farmer, was instrumental in hiding money needed to pay Washington’s troops. In later years, the poured concrete structure was occupied by Westchester County Commissioners of Public Welfare, V. Everit Macy and Miss Ruth Taylor among others, and became known as the “Commissioner’s House.” The Strawson family was the last to occupy the house from 1944-1960. Stanton M. Strawson was Commissioner of Public Welfare for Westchester County from 1950-1960.

       

      After that period, the “Strawson House” stood abandoned for many years. The building had been scheduled for demolition by the Westchester County Department of Public Works and in the interim, was used by the Fire Safety Training Unit for practice in putting out fires. After hearing of the demolition plans in 1979, the School of Medicine Alumni Association initiated a campaign to restore the building. By 1981, the Association had raised $75,000. On January 29, 1982, The House was leased to New York Medical College by Westchester County. On December 15, 1982, the Alumni Association presented a check for $230,000 to College President John J. Connolly. The campaign had met its goal and the effort to raise funds continued towards the restoration effort. Renovation began in June 1983. The building was restored as faithfully as possible in consultation with the County Planning Department. The front and back porticos were added and an open porch was enclosed for the boardroom in the 1980s. With the restoration completed, the dedication of the House took place on June 2, 1984.

       

      The Alumni House is now an elegant venue for meetings and events, and is now home to the administrative offices of NYMC Alumni Relations, as well as the Joseph Dersi, M.D. '59 Conference Room, and offers an elegant venue for meetings, receptions and alumni events.

       

    29. Residence Halls

      NYMC's student housing is composed of ten garden-style apartment buildings and five suite-style buildings.

       

      Grasslands I, the garden-style apartments, contain 100 studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments for families and non-traditional students.

       

      Grasslands II, the suite-style buildings, provides housing for 310 single students in 80 shared apartments.

    30. Student Center

      Centrally located in the residence hall complex is the Student Center Building, which houses a laundry facility and the Nicholas and Liberta Testa Fitness Center. The Fitness Center contains cardiovascular equipment and the other weight-training equipment.

       

      All full-time NYMC students and other occupants of Grasslands residential buildings may use the center 24-hours a day. The door is locked at all times and students may gain access to the building using their NYMC ID card. Students who do not reside on campus may obtain access to the recreational facilities through the Security Department, 914-594-4226.

       

      In addition to the Fitness Center, many students gather for informal sports competitions in the field behind Alumni House, and the outdoor-lit basketball courts located behind the Basic Sciences Building.

    31. NYMC Community Garden

      The NYMC Community Garden fosters an environment of sustainability, tranquility and creativity by growing flower, fruits and vegetables such as rhubarb, raddish, tomatoes, cucumbers, yellow squash, zucchini, beets, arugula, German radishes, baby leaf spinach, toy choi, bok choy, winterbor kale to name a few.

    32. 7 Dana Road

      7 Dana Road is the home of New York Medical College’s BioInc@NYMC, a biotechnology incubator, and Clinical Skills and Disaster Medicine Training Center.

       

      The Clinical Skills and Disaster Medicine Training Center provides state-of-the-art resources and technology to allow students to hone clinical skills in a safe and controlled environment before treating actual patients. Having Clinical Skills and Disaster Medicine under the same roof affords rich opportunity for collaboration.

       

      The Clinical Skills Center is a place for learners to practice a broad range of skills by examining “standardized patients” (highly trained actors) in fully equipped exam rooms. Learners also have access to simulator mannequins used to instruct specific skills such as CPR, suturing, and airway intervention for children and adults.

       

      The Center for Disaster Medicine uses this space to improve the skill and ability of students and health care professionals to render medical care during disasters, acts of terrorism and public health emergencies.

       

      BioInc@NYMC, New York Medical College's biotechnology incubator, offers shared resources, turnkey wet lab space, and sponsored professional services to promising, high-potential entrepreneurs and start-ups pursuing biomedical research activities. NYMC acquired the building in 2005 and renovations commenced in 2012.

       

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      The building formerly housed the Institute for Cancer Prevention, originally founded by Ernst Wynder, M.D. (1922-1999) in 1969 as the American Health Foundation, which focused on researching the cause and prevention of major chronic diseases.

      Wynder, a pioneer cancer researcher and epidemiologist, is known for his landmark research with Evarts Graham on the association between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Seeking an integrated cancer prevention center, a novel idea at the time, Wynder moved the facility to Valhalla in 1975. He named it the Naylor Dana Institute to honor the Eleanor Naylor Dana Foundation that contributed funds, along with the National Cancer Institute and private donors, towards its construction.

       

      In 2002, the facility was renamed the Institute for Cancer Prevention (IFCP) to more accurately reflect its focus on preventive medicine. Under Wynder’s leadership the IFCP became exclusively devoted to cancer prevention research, publishing more than 3,000 papers.

       

      Dr. Wynder, a champion of public health, extolled the importance of the role of education in preventive medicine and made it part of the IFCP’s mission. He developed outreach programs and school curricula, which promoted personal responsibility as an important component of prevention. His involvement in health policy and his active lobbying of government and industry led to legislation promoting disease prevention.

       

    33. The Clinical Skills and Disaster Medicine Training Center

      The Clinical Skills and Disaster Medicine Training Center contains 17,500 square feet of learning space—20 fully equipped patient exam rooms and two large simulation rooms and a 3,500-square foot auditorium, with capacity of 115 people. The Clinical Skills and Disaster Medicine Training Center is a place for learners to practice a broad range of skills from faculty guided peer training in physical examination, skill training utilizing standardized patients, team training exercises using simulated mannequins, and a large multi-functional classroom space to instruct students in specific clinical or procedural skills including CPR, suturing, airway management and line placement. This space is solely dedicated for clinical skills training and is not used for patient care.For students to gain experience as realistic and instructive as possible, the 20 exam rooms and two large simulation rooms are equipped with patented Learning Space technologies of Medical Education Technology, Inc. (M.E.T.I.). Ceiling-mounted and wall-mounted pan-tilt-zoom cameras, multi-directional microphones, two-way speakers, telephones and a computer allow for the data capture that yields immediate, detailed and useful feedback for students. The physical exam rooms are also equipped with wall-mounted instruments including blood pressure cuffs, otoscopes, ophthalmoscopes and an exam table, to replicate an exam room and orient students to a clinical-care environment. Outside each exam room is a writing station where learners can complete post-encounter exercises such as preparing patient notes, gaining valuable experience in the computer interface for electronic medical records (EMRs).


      Within the state-of-the-art simulation rooms are three Laerdal SimMan 3G high-fidelity patient simulators that are wireless, self-contained mannequins controlled remotely by faculty. This gives learners a chance to manage all facets of patient care scenarios, pharmacological interventions and responses and airway management. A Laerdal SimJunior teaches a broad range of pediatric skills in multiple patient care settings, both within and outside the hospital environment. Simulation training with both adult and pediatric mannequins includes various basic and advanced life support course modules. In addition, simulation rooms and nearby classrooms can be arranged to mimic different field and hospital environments to provide unique training in disaster management.

    34. Simulation Room

      Simulation-based medical education using mannequins and actors has grown increasingly important for healthcare professionals.

       

      In the past, medical students learned by watching their senior colleagues interact with real patients in a hospital, then performing those procedures on patients themselves: the “see one, do one, teach one” model.

       

      The simulated patients at the Center create a better alternative, one that reflects NYMC’s commitment to patient safety, patient rights and medical excellence. Starting from their initial pre-clinical skills classes, students enjoy the advantage of a controlled environment in which to hone skills, both procedural and inter-personal, before encountering actual patients. The standardized patients, task trainers, and high-fidelity simulation equipment promote “hands-on” active learning, which not only enhances retention and diagnostic reasoning; it also underscores the importance of focusing on the patient.

    35. Dr. Edward F. and Mrs. Anna M. Asprinio Fitness Center

      New York Medical College is proud to announce the opening of our newest wellness resource, the Dr. Edward F. and Mrs. Anna M. Asprinio Fitness Center. The Fitness Center—which will introduce a new level of health and wellness to our campus—is located on the ground floor of 19 Skyline Drive and will be open daily from 6:00 a.m. to midnight. The Fitness Center is a free facility open to members of the NYMC student body.

      Please note: an NYMC ID card is required to access the facility. A building security guard is on duty from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each weekday and both the building and fitness center are video monitored by security 24/7.

    36. BioInc@NYMC

      BioInc@NYMC is the Hudson Valley’s only biotechnology incubator offering shared resources, turnkey wet lab space, and sponsored professional services to promising, high-potential entrepreneurs and start-ups. In addition to providing best-in-class infrastructure and operational services, BioInc@NYMC assists its members in refining their business strategies, conserving capital, building strong teams, and achieving development and funding milestones.


      BioInc@NYMC occupies a 10,000 square-foot wing of a 129,000 square-foot campus building. An initial build-out of 4,500 square feet with finished laboratories, offices and shared infrastructure is ready for immediate occupancy. Development of the remaining space is planned to proceed as the initial spaces are filled. Additional available space in the same building (50,000-60,000 square feet) is ideal for future growth of the incubator or related biomedical research activities.

    37. 19 Skyline Drive

      Overlooking the Rockefeller Estates at Pocantico Hills, 19 Skyline Drive is a 248,000 square foot, class A+ building complex that sits on 12 acres off Route 9A adjacent to the main NYMC campus. The five-story mirror-façade building complex houses a 115-seat auditorium/conference room; a dining area and an outdoor dining plaza; a branch of NYMC’s Health Sciences Library and reading room; as well as a 720-space parking lot.

       

      Formerly part of the headquarters for IBM Research, 19 Skyline Drive was originally designed by Michael Harris Spector as part of the 75-acre Mid-Westchester Executive Park in 1984, and was purchased by NYMC in 2013.

    38. Skyline Lobby

    39. The Health Sciences Library (HSL) Skyline Branch

      Besides the main Library in the BSB, The Health Sciences Library has an additional 3,033 square foot branch at the 19 Skyline Drive building complex.

       

      It consists of a main reading room, an adjacent smaller reading room with large windows, and a consultation room to schedule appointments with librarians.

    40. Skyline Auditorium

    41. Westchester Medical Center

      Westchester Medical Center (WMC) is a 652-bed Regional Trauma Center providing health services to residents of the Hudson Valley, northern New Jersey, and southern Connecticut. Westchester Medical Center is the primary academic medical center and University Hospital of New York Medical College. Many of New York Medical College’s faculty provide patient care, teach, and conduct research on the shared campus.

       

      Westchester Medical Center is home to the Hudson Valley Region’s only Level I Trauma Center (both adult & pediatric with 24/7 Medevac); organ transplant center; full-service Heart Center; pediatric ICU; Level IV Neonatal ICU (Regional Perinatal Center); burn center between NYC and north to Canadian border. WMC is one of the region’s largest sources of employment; employing over 5,000--including 900 attending physicians.

       

      100 Woods Rd, Valhalla, NY 10595

      www.westchestermedicalcenter.com

       

      _________________________

       

       

      What is now known as Westchester Medical Center began in 1918 when the U.S. Army took over county buildings to set up an Army Hospital for treating troops affected by the Spanish Influenza epidemic.  In 1920, the Army returned the buildings to the Westchester County government as a fully equipped hospital.

      After renaming the campus Grasslands Hospital, the county began caring for those suffering from several prevalent diseases of the 1920s and 1930s. Entire buildings were devoted to treating both adult and child patients with tuberculosis, and the center eventually became a center for treating victims of other great medical illnesses such as polio, scarlet fever and diphtheria during the early and mid 20th century.

       

      Staffed largely by volunteer physicians during its early history, Grasslands Hospital was one of the first public institutions to establish a Renal Dialysis Unit and a cardiovascular service, which earned an outstanding reputation that still endures today.

       

      NYMC's move to Westchester County in 1971 prompted the county to build a new hospital as an academic affiliate of the College.

       

      After more than a half century, Grasslands Hospital was closed in 1977 to make way for its modern cousin, the newly built regional academic medical center known as Westchester Medical Center.

       

      In 1998, Westchester Medical Center became an independent institution by breaking away from the county government. Today, in its new format as a public benefit corporation, Westchester Medical Center still maintains its public mission to treat anyone in need of advanced medical care.

    42. Maria Fareri Children's Hospital at Westchester Medical Center

      As part of Westchester Medical Center, an academic health affiliate of New York Medical College, Maria Fareri Children's Hospital at Westchester Medical Center is also a major teaching facility offering advanced care pediatrics serving New York’s Hudson Valley region and parts of Fairfield County, Connecticut. Opened in 2004, Maria Fareri Children's Hospital (MFCH) is a world-class, all-specialty pediatric hospital offering a unique physical environment for our more than 20,000young patients and their families each year. MFCH is part of the national Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, and is the only hospital in the U.S. named after a child.

       

      Featuring a lobby with the world's largest dollhouse, a sports arcade, a performing arts stage and a walk-through aquarium, MFCH offers the most advanced pediatric care available in an environment where the creative surroundings are a functional part of the healing process.

       

      Maria Fareri Children's Hospital at Westchester Medical Center
      100 Woods Road
      Valhalla, NY 10595

      www.westchestermedicalcenter.com/mfch

       

    43. Medevac Helicopter Landing

      Westchester Medical Center is home to the only Level 1pediatric Trauma Center with 24-hour medevac helicopter and ground transport in the Hudson Valley region;  STAT Flight-staffed helicopters include teams of critical care flight nurses and paramedics. Aviation services provided by Air Methods Corporation.

    44. 169 Barclay Street Residence Hall (New Jersey)

      Located across the street from St.Joseph's Regional Medical Center, this 42-unit, six-floor building has 14 studios and 28 one-bedroom units. Opened in Fall of 2015, the building is fully accessible and has two workout rooms and  laundry room.  It is video monitored 24/7 and security patrols visits the property several times daily. 
    45. Touro College of Dental Medicine at New York Medical College

      New York state’s first new dental school in nearly 50 years opened in the fall of 2016. Located on the campus of New York Medical College, Touro College of Dental Medicine, which encompasses 100,000 square feet within the newly renovated 19 Skyline Drive complex, boasts state-of-art facilities and student amenities. These include a 112-seat simulation lab, 132-chair clinic facility divided into eight clinical practice units, a pediatric dentistry clinic, an oral and maxillofacial surgery clinic, multiple student workrooms, two 120-seat auditoriums, a library, an exercise facility, and 2,000 square foot student lounge. http://www.dental.touro.edu